The 10 Best Overseas Countries to Work In

If you’re contemplating a move overseas and are fairly confident you’d like to (a) get a decent job that allows you to maintain an enviable work/life balance and (b) not have to sleep in a dumpster, then it’s worth doing a bit of research into which countries offer the best employment opportunities.

Here are ten you should consider according to the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development).


Germany


Germans are slack bastards, working, on average, a measly 27.8 hours per week. So … their standard of living must be shite then?

You’d be wrong – Germany is one of the most stable economies in Europe. And they make great beer.

But you’ll never love it as much as this guy.


Denmark


Ranked numero uno by the OECD for the world’s best work/life balance (and number three on the UN’s 2015 World Happiness Report), the Danes are also blessed with 34 paid holidays and only 0.4 per cent of employees actually work more than 50 hours a week.

That’s great, Danes.


France


The French also seem to love their paid holidays. In fact, these cheeky frogs work 200 hours less each year because of ‘em.

Per year they rack up 40 days in total, 10 of which are public holidays. Oohh la la. More time for crepe-eating and champagne sampling, eh?


Finland


Like to continue your journey on the paid holiday train? Then hot-foot-it to Finland, ‘cause there you’ll get up to 40 days a year (30 plus 10 public holidays) and again, only 0.4 percent of employees work more than 50 hours a week.

That’s more time for soothing saunas.


Lithuania


This fine country offers 41 paid holidays a year and if you’re planning on getting up the duff, you can look forward to a generous maternity leave package.

That will allow plenty of time to stuff your face with plate loads of jam-filled tortes.


Bulgaria


While we’re on this knocked-up track, did you know that in Bulgaria women are given up to 410 days of paid maternity leave (at 90% of mum-to-be’s salary) and that husbands or parents can opt in for the second year of maternity leave so that mum can return to work? Or not.


Norway


Baby-up people. Because here you’ll get 47 weeks maternity leave (at 100% of your salary), with 12 weeks of ‘daddy quota’.

Plus, in between copulating, you can enjoy 35 days of paid holidays per year as well. Round the world holiday (with small child in tow) anyone? 


Sweden


Widely acknowledged as the most generous country in terms of parental leave benefits, Swedes can take up to 16 months maternity leave, plus those days can be used however mummy and daddy see fit over the first eight years of their kid’s life.

Mental health days – here we come!


Netherlands


And finally, the super-slackers – the Dutch, who work only 27.6 hours a week, enjoy 28 paid holidays, 16 weeks paid maternity leave and tax breaks on an additional 26 weeks of maternity leave if they so choose.

That means plenty of long weekends in Amsterdam (possibly without the kids).