7 Reasons You’re Pissing Off Your Boss

From Miranda Priestly in The Devil Wears Prada to Bill Lumbergh in Office Space, there are plenty of horrible bosses out there.

But while it’s easy to whine, moan and point fingers at the guys at the top, take a minute to consider your own behaviour. Here’s a thought: your boss might not always be the problem.

Check out these seven things you could be doing that your boss hates.


Being Unreliable


When it comes down to it, bosses essentially want just two things from you: your job done well and on time.

If hitting deadlines and being accountable for your work is a struggle for you, then there’s fair reason they may start to resent you.

boss

So, make their life easier by taking responsibility and getting things done when you say you will. And if you’re struggling with a deadline be honest, delegate where possible, and ask for help.


Creating Drama


Unnecessary panic, tears and gossip in the office are not going to win your boss over. Not only will it damage your reputation as a professional, needless drama will make the working day more stressful than it needs to be.

Bosses hate gossip and chaos; they’ve got enough on their plate without worrying about your drama. Pay attention to office culture and follow the example of your (hopefully calm and in control) leader.

If the person at the top is a sucker for workplace drama, do your best to stay out of it, no matter how included you think it’ll make you feel.


Chucking Sickies


Sick leave is given for a reason: being genuinely sick. So when that’s continually abused, bosses notice and start to wonder about commitment levels. They want people who are passionate, interested and eager to work.

Repeatedly calling in sick with poor excuses shows you’re none of those things.

So do yourself, your supervisor and colleagues a favour and save the leave for when you actually need it.


Too Much Noise


Whether it’s a loud ringtone, a noisy personal conversation or YouTube videos on speaker, there’s nothing worse than annoying distractions for co-workers and bosses trying to work.

In an open office, nothing goes unnoticed. So do yourself a favour. Take personal calls outside shared space, plug headphones into the computer and turn your phone on silent if possible. It’ll save a lot of headache for those around you.


Asking Too Many Questions


It’s important to be clear on instructions, but asking too many questions, especially when you could find the answer yourself, shows laziness and a lack of initiative. The flipside of this is obviously not getting enough clarification before starting a task, so it can be a tricky line to balance.

Always try and figure it out yourself or ask colleagues before interrupting the boss. They don’t know the answer to everything anyway, so if you can find it on your own, you’ll save a lot of time and effort, plus get the satisfaction of solving the puzzle by yourself.


Making Your Boss Look Stupid


One of the worst things employees can do is make their boss look bad in front of others. Going over their head, keeping them out of the loop and criticising them in front of others will drive a boss mad.

It might bring a few minutes of gloating and satisfaction, but there are zero long-term benefits of doing this.

If they’re really that bad, chances are you’re not alone in your thinking. But speaking negatively about your boss to others in the company is also a huge mistake. Instead of complaining and trying to sabotage your boss’s efforts, provide honest feedback and keep them updated about your projects.


Being Negative


Negativity spreads like wildfire, meaning one disgruntled employee can be a huge problem for a boss. If you’re always complaining about problems, whinging about your workload, salary and co-workers without providing solutions, your boss is going to get pretty fed up.

Keep the negativity in check, come up with solutions to problems, and if you’re not in a job you love, start looking for one that you do.